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Personal Injury Blog

  • Maryland Court Refuses to Admit Evidence that Defendant Driver was Uninsured

    Posted By Chaikin, Sherman, Cammarata, Siegel, P.C. || 7-Jan-2015

    By: Matthew Tievsky

    In Maryland, like other states, every driver is required by law to obtain auto insurance to cover their own legal liability. This is so that if a driver negligently hits you, the driver can afford to pay you in compensation. But if the defendant driver failed to purchase insurance, can you present this fact at trial in an effort to show that the defendant was at fault for the collision? Generally, the answer is "no." The reason is that a driver's insurance status doesn't directly relate to whether the driver was negligent on the particular occasion that he/she had a collision with you.Auto Insurance Personal Injury

    Maryland's Court of Special Appeals recently reinforced this principle in the case of Asphalt & Concrete Services v. Perry. In that case, the plaintiff tried to introduce evidence of insurance status in a context slightly different than the one described above: A driver of a dump truck struck a pedestrian. The pedestrian sued the driver, but also alleged that the company who hired him (through another company) was negligent, because the truck driver was incompetent and the company should have known that the driver was going to cause an accident. Among other evidence, the pedestrian tried to introduce evidence that the driver was in fact uninsured, to show that the company should have known better than to hire the driver. However, the Court of Special Appeals held that the driver's insurance status did not relate to his competence as a driver, and therefore held that the driver's lack of insurance should not have been presented to the jury.

    When a negligent driver is uninsured, this certainly imposes a burden upon the rest of us, who may be left in the lurch if the defendant can't afford to compensate the person he/she hurts. Unfortunately, however, the lack of insurance generally can't be presented to a jury at trial.

    If you have questions about the insurance status of a negligent driver, you should contact the personal injury attorneys at Chaikin, Sherman, Cammarata & Siegel, P.C.

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